Loading Events

Welcome to Dragon Dreaming Festival 2018!

Join us to celebrate the 10th edition of Dragon Dreaming Festival on the shores of Lake Burrinjuck, NSW.

Just a 6.5-hour drive from Melbourne’s northern suburbs, DD18 is the best outta town escape from the onslaught of fascinators over the Melbourne Cup long weekend.

Music, art, culture, and fun are planned over three epic music stages, workshop zone and kids area to keep you busy for four days. Walk around the market zone to get beguiled by trinkets and wares galore or simply chill out lakeside in your floaties.

LINEUP SO FAR:

Entheogenic (US)
Bwoy de Bhajan (DK)
Grouch in Dub (NZ)
Kukan Dub Lagan (ES) – Mikelabella Records
Sorian (ES) – Mikelabella Records
Govinda (US)

and more

Location

The Wee Jasper valley lies within the traditional country of the Wiradjuri people, who inhabited the area for tens of thousands of years before European settlement.

The Yass region, including the Wee Jasper valley, has traditionally been inhabited by the Aboriginal Ngunnawal and Wiradjuri Tribes.

The Ngunnawal tribe covered the area which is present-day Canberra and also extends into the majority of the Yass Valley area. Wiradjuri covered a large portion of NSW, but only a small part within the western edge of the present-day Yass Valley local government area.

As you travel down the winding road towards Wee Jasper, panoramic views of the Murrumbidgee and Goodradigbee valleys and the stored waters of Burrinjuck Dam unfold.

Clear views of limestone rock formations and extensive folding, millions of years old, can be seen in many of the hillsides and the cliffs arising from the rivers. Geologically described as an “Anticline” formed in the Devonian period, the formation is estimated to be roughly 400,000,000 years old. The dramatic limestone outcrops have significant scientific and educational values associated with their structural geology, caves and diversity of marine fossils.

Today Wee Jasper town is a picturesque village of about 80 people in the pretty Goodradigbee valley at the western foot of the Brindabella Ranges, on the backwaters of Burrinjuck Dam.

According to folklore, the name Wee Jasper is attributed to an early resident, McBean, an old Scot, who was one of the earliest settlers.

McBean, so the story goes, arrived home one day with some “wee” (Scottish for small) “Jasper” (a type of gemstone found in the area)” in his pocket, found in some obscure stream in the hills.

For more information, please visit:

Leave A Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.